Posts Tagged ‘Tarkine’

framing a vision for the tarkine

framing a vision for the tarkine

Last year the battles were about logging native timber in the Tarkine, right now it’s about mining. On the one hand there is the economic growth argument about extracting valuable minerals, and on the other the recognition of the significance of the ecosystem. Finding sensible solutions must start with an understanding of the place and the issues, and finish with a spirit of compromise, because there are no right answers in these debates.

There’s no doubt that the Tarkine is one of the world’s great wild places. It is a landscape of such breathtaking beauty that it is impossible not to love it. It is an expansive 447,000 hectare wilderness area which contains remarkable natural and cultural values, including one of the world’s most significant remaining tracts of temperate rainforest.

 The Tarkine is now generally recognised as that part of north west Tasmania bounded by the Arthur River and its tributaries to the north, the Pieman River to the south, the Murchison Highway to the east and the Southern Ocean to the west. Most of the land is either managed by Forestry Tasmania or the Parks and Wildlife Service. Much of the Tarkine is listed on the Register of the National Estate and there are a number of reserves that provide the Tarkine with some level of conservation protection.  

The Cradle Coast Authority Master Plan for the Tarkine describes it as, “a place of sustenance for its inhabitants, a breathtaking, fragile wilderness for those in search of renewal, a robust landscape rich in minerals and forest resources, and a playground for the communities that surround it”. 

The Tarkine is Australia’s most significant tract of rainforest wilderness and Tasmania’s largest unprotected wilderness area. It is described by the Australian Heritage Commission as “one of the world’s great archeological regions” with aboriginal middens, artefacts and rock carvings that predate the pyramids. 

There’s been much debate and emotion about land use priorities in the area – for tourism access, primary production, logging and mining. Conservationists have sought to have the Tarkine classified under the world heritage listing. The Forests Agreement of September 2011 has brought timber industry and conservationists closer, although many issues remained unresolved. Tasmania, now facing reductions in contribution from commercial timber, is increasingly looking to the resources sector for economic growth.

How do we, as stewards of this 60 million year old wilderness, make sensible decisions on its future at any point in time? We can rest assured that it will involve compromise from all sides. As a plan is developed for the Tarkine, some guiding principles are needed, and these might be a good start:

  1. Manage the Tarkine for multiple end use according to the sensitivity and significance of particular areas, rather than lock it up
  2. Special parts of the Tarkine, notably the primary rainforest, should be totally protected from logging, mining and recreational vehicles (these areas may be the focus of world heritage)
  3. Controlled tourism access that leaves no footprint should be encouraged
  4. Community involvement in decision making is essential

 Such guidelines need fleshing out and adding to. They may well end up allowing a flourishing adventure tourism industry based on walking, some selective logging for value added timber in agreed areas and mining with appropriate rehabilitation, in areas other than primary rainforest. Honey production and agriculture in existing cleared areas would sit comfortably under these guidelines.

 They would not, however, allow clear felling of native timber in the region, nor allow projects such as the proposed open cut tin and tungsten mine in primary rainforest at Mount Lindsay by Venture Minerals. That particular proposal, for a 3.5km x 3km 200 metre deep mine, is not within the scope of these guidelines. It’s also the sort of project that depends on the price of tin to be high for its sustainability.

 If the right information is gathered and shared, and if there is willingness to compromise, worthwhile outcomes can flow. They will only be forged by people working together. As the old African proverb goes:

“if you want to go fast, go alone, if you want to go far, go together”.

We also need to remember that we are transitory human beings making decisions in a microsecond of time, in the context of what has gone before us.

reality of climate change - the trees don't lie

reality of climate change – the trees don’t lie

A few weeks ago, I was standing in awe of the forest giants in the world’s second largest temperate rainforest, the Tarkine, in Tasmania’s north-west. Little did I know that these trees are silent recorders of the environment. Not until Mike Peterson, an experienced forester, unlocked the secrets of dendrochronology – or tree ring analysis.

Many trees produce a single ring of growth in a year. Because climate and environment affect the way trees grow, the size of the annual rings varies from year to year. Dendrochronology requires knowledge of the exact years during which individual rings grew, which is achieved by carbon dating technology. In Tasmania, 1500 year old Huon pines from Mount Read have been cored with a small 5mm increment borer, and with other samples from dead tress and partially buried logs in the stand, it has been possible for tree ring scientists to develop a chronolgy of more than 4000 years.

Climatologists use the statistical association between ring width and weather data to estimate climate variation in the past. Mike sidled up to the back of his ute and pulled out some cores from old Huon Pine specimens that dated back more than 1000 years. He then showed me his published work, in conjunction with the University of Tasmania, on temperature variation over this period. Guess what? There was about 0.5 degrees Celsius of average variation for the entire 1000 year period until we get to the 1960′s. From that time on, the tree rings suggest that temperatures have climbed an incredible 1.0 to 1.5 degrees Celsius in an unbroken upward trend line. The trees don’t lie. They are detecting and recording global warming, deep in the Tasmanian rainforest.

I was amazed at what I’d been shown, not that I need any convincing about global warming, and the contribution of man to it – and yet the sceptics continue to give our decision makers licence to stall action. John Quiggin (AFR Feb 3, 2011 – no hyperlink because of Fairfax content charging policy!) captures my perspective when he argues that “the spoilers generally lack the understanding of basic statistical analysis of trends in time series, or the fundamentals of the greenhouse effect. Worse, they haven’t bothered to learn”. Regardless of their scepticism in the light of overwhelming scientific evidence, it would be pretty hard for these people to mount effective arguments against the evidence that I saw – presented first hand by the mighty Huon Pines of  Tasmania.

If you’re really interested in the subject, then you might even be interested in attending the second Asian Dendrochronology Conference in Xian, China in August 2011! And I’ve just heard that the next major international conference “World Dendro 2014″, will be held in Melbourne, with several excursions and field studies planned for Tasmania.