Posts Tagged ‘authenticity’

leadership on a t shirt

Often the best leaders achieve success through just being themselves, acting authentically and intuitively. Some of them are compelling individuals, possessing that special combination of strength and warmth, bringing people with them on a journey.

Many others struggle, having been thrust into leadership roles from functional areas with few reference points or training. Many of them lurch instinctively towards authority and control behaviours, which undermine their leadership effectiveness. Coaching, mentoring and training are therefore important in enabling successful leaders, but beware…..

….there’s a leadership advisory industry out there, offering advice to anyone prepared to put their hands up for the challenge. It’s hard for aspiring leaders to sift through this jungle and know what really counts. Organisations like 20I20 exchange, where it’s more about asking the right questions than providing the right answers, stand out in the crowded ocean of leadership development.

Through the school of hard knocks, much reading and many conversations on leadership over forty years, I have formed a view that there are six big enablers to effective leadership. They are to:

  • LISTEN and UNDERSTAND
  • INCLUDE and EMPOWER
  • Be COURAGEOUS and DISRUPTIVE
  • Foster VISION and POSSIBILITY
  • Be INDEPENDENT and FOCUSED
  • Act with INTEGRITY and lead with WISDOM

One of the authors and experts on leadership who I enjoy reading is Dan Rockwell, also known as “The Leadership Freak”. Dan runs a blog and tweets @leadershipfreak. His twitter sphere content is prolific and incisive, so I’ve gathered 25 of his best one-liners (leadership on a t shirt) in support of my six themes. They all add colour and richness to otherwise dry headings. Thanks Dan.

1. LISTEN and UNDERSTAND

 “Your worst problem is believing you know the problem when you don’t”

“No one listens until they feel as though you’ve listened to them”

“Moving people begins when you understand them not when they understand you”

“Understand others before challenging them”

2. INCLUDE and EMPOWER

 “Everyone who’s making a big difference in the world is doing it with others”

 “Reach higher by helping others reach higher”

“If leadership is about people, why are you focused on projects?”

 “The more responsibility you expect, the more freedom you should give”

 “Those who cling to authority lose it, those who give authority gain it”

3. FIND COURAGE and DISRUPT

“Leaders who are afraid to rock the boat, eventually sink the boat”

“If you’re satisfied with the world you aren’t a leader”

“Delay makes confrontation more difficult”

 “Meaningful leadership means identifying tough problems and solving them”

4. FOSTER POSSIBILITY and VISION

“Leaders don’t let the past control the future”

 “Great leaders fuel fires. Lousy leaders drown dreams”

“Get people talking about their dreams to inspire others”

“Those who wait for the future to change repeat the present”

5. BE INDEPENDENT and FOCUSED

“Those who are uncommitted find fault. Those who are committed find a way”

“The need to fit in motivates deception and creates mediocrity”

“Indecisive leaders who need to please everyone end up pleasing no one”

 “Weak leaders constantly point out what’s wrong with others”

6. Lead with INTEGRITY and WISDOM

“Leaders who sweep issues under the table will lead stagnant inefficient organisations”

 “The core quality of leaders with wisdom is they seek wisdom”

 “Self-protection and leadership cannot live together”

“Pretending everything is ok doesn’t instil confidence in those who know it isn’t”

What resonates with you?

cultivating an open mind

cultivating an open mind

Most of us claim to have an open mind, but we often stop walking the talk when it comes to certain beliefs and opinions, some which can be held dogmatically. Dogma can lead to intolerance (does anyone spring to mind?)  No matter how open minded we think we are, we still shut off new things or alternative perspectives, just not realising the rut we’re in.

An open mind doesn’t mean that we fail to develop convictions, rather it means being able to question things – even our central beliefs. It gives us the capacity to think on both sides of an argument, and the chance to grow, and to change. I was surprised, early in my career, to see the reluctance of people to embrace change, and so developed an appetite for helping people and organisations accept and grow with change.

There are two paradoxes associated with change. Firstly, to achieve continuity, we have to be willing to change. Change is in fact the only way to protect what exists, for without continuous readjustment the present can’t continue. A marriage, a career, a dream for the future are all destroyed if they don’t change over time. The second paradox is that the very things we wish to hold on to and keep safe from change, were originally produced by changes.

Having an open mind takes courage, because it challenges our minds. After all, we can decide whether we want to be disturbed or remain in the comfort zone, both personally and professionally.  I think that the keys to an open mind are curiosity, and affirmative listening. When we listen affirmatively we listen for the possibilities for ourselves and others, we hear more than the words, and we hear the person behind the words. 

Being open minded keeps alive the childlike appetite for what’s next, and enriches our lives. This often occurs through working together with like-minded people to express our own values, but can also occur through partnerships that are not as obvious.

There are many examples of people with different mindsets and beliefs coming together to achieve amazing things. In these cases, on open mind or a willingness to overcome barriers to partnerships that don’t come naturally, is important.

 I continue to be excited about the possibilities around partnerships across generations. Business and life experiences with my children and their mates have been inspiring. They bring fresh ideas, hunger and new skill sets to the table of experience and wisdom. There are so many opportunities for young people and older people to work effectively together. Bring it on! Combine the dreamers and the pragmatists, the wired and the wise to capture the benefits of mutual learning, and the different perspectives that resonate with different audiences….and do it with an open mind.

Can I challenge you this week to take on one thing that you’ve made your mind up about….and open it?

…in all humility

My daughters are great levellers! At the very hint of immodesty or pretension, they nip me in the bud, offering an ironic preface for my comments, “in all humility….” We smile, but the point is powerfully made, and I feel fortunate to have their love and support.

While being humble doesn’t come naturally, I admire and respect people who have managed to use humility to achieve that delightful balance in their lives between ego and lack of confidence. Humility requires not that we think less of ourselves but that we think of ourselves less often. If the report in The Age is right, we are seeing an epidemic of obsession with self, where narcissism measured among university students has risen from 15% to 30% in the last 30 years.

Recently I shared a flight to Melbourne with the gorgeous Jennifer Hawkins and was able to share with her a story about her own humility, passed on by a 30 year old friend of my daughters. He’d been overseas for a few years, returned to Australia and met Jennifer on a boat where she was filming for Getaway. Not knowing who she was, he asked how she had got this great job. She said, “I was lucky”, but my friend kept persisting, “This is a great gig – tell me how – it must have been more than luck!” Finally she succumbed, “I won a competition”. “What competition was that?” he pressed. “Miss Universe”, came the response – at which point our friend hot- footed it to the back of the boat in tongue tied panic! As I retold the story to Jennifer, I again saw living proof of the authenticity and lack of pretension from someone who has the world at her feet, yet who is delightfully grounded by her modesty and humility.

Bruno Martinuzzi believes that humility is liberating and enabling. Being in a state of non- pretence improves relationships, reduces anxiety, encourages openness and paradoxically, enhances self -confidence. His tips for practising humility are worth a look. They include using phrases like, “You are right”, “How am I doing?” and in the daily contests of life, stopping talking and allowing the other person to be in the limelight.

He also cautions against confusing humility with timidity. It’s not about self-denigration. It’s about maintaining pride in who we are and what we’ve achieved without arrogance or hubris. It’s about being content to let others discover our talents without having to boast about them.

There are plenty of great quotes about humility. I like these ones.

 William Safire says “Nobody stands taller than those willing to be corrected”.

Fulton Sheen, “A proud man counts his newspaper clippings, the humble one his blessings”.

James Barrie, “Life is a long lesson in humility”.

 Ralph Stockman, “True humility is intelligent self-respect which keeps us from thinking too highly or too meanly of ourselves. It makes us modest by reminding us how far we come short of what we can be”

I’ve long been interested in the role of humility in leadership. Jim Collins identifies great (level 5) leaders who have the unique blend of humility and will, the antithesis of the heroic, charismatic leader. Will often has elements of courage and passion. We need humility to stop the courage being foolhardy and the passion being overbearing. Humility is inward looking in a way that other virtues are not. It’s the stance we take towards ourselves before it’s a stance we take towards others. It’s the glue with which we form effective partnerships and relationships.

Can ego and humility co-exist? David Marcum and Stephen Smith  in the must-read book “Egonomics”, suggest that humility has a reputation of being the polar opposite of excessive ego. In fact, the exact opposite of excessive ego is no confidence at all. Humility provides the crucial balance between the two extremes. Humility is a means to an end that leads to openness and progress.

Finally, Kathryn Britton gives an interesting overview of humility and how it is learned.

Well, I feel quite pleased with this blog…..in all humility!

organisational authenticity and meaning

organisational authenticity and meaning

Business bookshelves are groaning under the weight of single ideas padded out to 250 pages, recycled and repackaged messages and occasionally, some ground breaking insights. I recently read a book that falls into the last category – “ Meaning Inc. – the Blueprint for Business Success in the 21st century” by Gurnek Bains. Bains is founder and CEO of YSC, a corporate psychology consultancy with global offices.

This is not another “In Search of Excellence” or “Built to Last” – books that looked in the rear view mirror and reverse engineered the precursors of success. Many of their successful companies floundered. Bains, using the widespread research of YSC, has delivered a concept that is enduring and creates meaning for employees, customers and stakeholders. His premise is that bringing meaning into the workplace is the best way to motivate staff and achieve sustainable high performance, and uses a number of corporate examples on the journey.

Bains argues that the following attributes are present in companies who create meaning:

  • An invigorating sense of purpose that goes beyond business success and which makes people feel that they are changing society as opposed to servicing needs
  • The courage to set extremely challenging goals and to be ground breaking in the pursuit of the core purpose
  • An innovative approach to benefits and the treatment of people which makes them feel special
  • A culture that allows people to be themselves and to feel that they are personally making a difference and utilizing their distinct talents
  • A rigorous and at times almost aggressive approach to evaluating performance and contribution
  • Clear and authentically grounded values which are lived through thick and thin
  • A concern for the sider and particularly, the environmental and societal impacts of business activities
  • Through all the above, an excellent reputation with consumers and other political and social stakeholders
  • Excellent long term performance coupled with a preparedness to sacrifice short term gains if their achievement conflicts with the core purpose and values.

I must say that from recent experience, particularly working with people under 35, this series of prerequisites really resonates. It is all about being authentic. I have now shared this book with four CEO’s who all claim it has impacted significantly on their approach to their leadership and buy in from staff.

A clear sense of purpose and the leadership vision to set a course based on the Bains approach, depends on the CEO and her executive team. Once established, it has a much better chance of success if reinforced through measurement, something which will, in its own right, make a significant contribution to productivity and performance.